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Hacienda Heights

Hacienda Heights is an unincorporated suburban community and census-designated place in Los Angeles County, California, United States. Hacienda Heights is the second largest census designated place in Los Angeles County by area and the county's second largest CDP by population. Hacienda Heights is a predominantly residential neighborhood. Hacienda Heights also has the Puente Hills forming its 'green belt' southern border and much of its western border. The "Puente Hills Landfill Native Habitat Preservation Authority" supports public enjoyment and access of the nearby parkland in the Puente Hills.

Originally an agricultural town, beginning in the 1940s and accelerating in the 1950s, suburban residential development, which occurred southward (beginning on subdivisions near Kwis Avenue), transformed Hacienda Heights into a residential or bedroom community. In 1961, the Hacienda Heights Branch of the Los Angeles County Public Library opened. The following year, in 1961, the area was renamed Hacienda Heights.

View Properties

Avg Work Commute

32 mins

Median Age

40

Median Area Income

$76,169

Median Sale Price

$518,250



About Hacienda Heights

  • Elevation: 138 m
  • Zip codes: 91745
  • Points of Interest: Hsi Lai Temple,Homestead Museum ,Sunset and Moonset Radial Lines

The George Key Ranch Historic District is a historic citrus ranch and Victorian ranch house in Placentia. It is now within the 2-acre George Key Ranch Historic Park, with the historic house museum, outdoor displays, and a citrus grove. It is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Placentia-Santa Fe District is in the southwest or downtown area. The town is home to the A. S. Bradford House, a historic house museum. It is also home to the 100 year old Berkenstock Mansion.

In 1973, Chicano Park's "founding lead artist" Guillermo Aranda and "founding apprentice artist" Ernesto "Neto" Paul (San Diego, CA natives) collaborated with the art students of the University of California, Irvine (UCI) in painting a mural (approxitmately 8' x 36') on the walls of the Tlatepaque Restaurant. Aranda was invited by a Professor at UCI. The following year the chairman of Toltecas en Aztlan, and the board director of The Centro Cultural De La Raza, Guillermo Aranda, also invited these same Orange County artists referred to as the "Santa Ana Muralists/Santa Ana Artists," to come to Chicano Park and paint on one of the first pillars (2nd painted pillar) of Chicano Park.